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Preventing Alzheimer's Disease: Lifestyle, Activity, and Chronic Condition Management

Preventing Alzheimer's Disease: Lifestyle, Activity, and Chronic Condition Management

 





Silent brain changes have been found to occur before the onset of Alzheimer's disease, emphasizing the importance of early detection and intervention. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment is a widely used tool to assess cognitive function and detect potential signs of Alzheimer's. Symptoms of Alzheimer's include memory loss, confusion and difficulties in daily life. Dementia is a general term for cognitive decline caused by various conditions, while Alzheimer's disease is a specific type of dementia characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques and tau tangles in the brain. Strategies to prevent Alzheimer's include maintaining a healthy lifestyle, staying mentally and physically active, and managing chronic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Early signs of dementia in women include memory loss, impaired concentration and changes in mood and behavior. Senile dementia is an old term that has been replaced by the more specific diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. Udem's neuroscience and cognitive research areas focus on understanding the brain mechanisms underlying cognition and behavior. Mild cognitive impairment is an intermediate stage between normal age-related cognitive decline and dementia, while functional cognitive impairment refers to cognitive symptoms that cannot be explained by the underlying disease. It is important to distinguish between dementia and Alzheimer's disease, as Alzheimer's disease is only one potential cause of dementia. Overall, Alzheimer's disease and dementia are related but not the same and it is important to understand the distinction between the two in order to provide appropriate care and support to people affected by these conditions.

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